• December 2015

December 2015

 

DECEMBER 2015

WHAT'S NEW

Humans are the only mammals that willingly delay sleep!

 



SLEEP: ESSENTIAL FOR MIND-BODY HEALTH

Adults and children alike are spending more time awake late at night to study, work, or have fun. All those late nights may be slowly killing us. More than 20 years of research shows us that sleep is vitally important to physical and mental health.

Most of what we know about sleep and health comes from studies of what happens to the mind and body when we don't sleep enough, or at all. In animal and human studies, living without sleep for even a few months resulted in death. Sleeping fewer than 8 hours a night on a regular basis is associated with increased risk for diabetes, heart disease and stroke, depression, colds and flu, and obesity.

WHILE WE ARE SLEEPING...

Sleep affects brain chemistry and has an important role in the functioning of the nervous, immune and endocrine systems. During sleep we develop and reinforce neural pathways involved in memory, learning, and emotion. New research suggests sleep helps flush toxins from the brain.

While we are sleeping, the body manufactures hormones that repair damage caused by stress and the environment in which we work and play. Growth hormone cleanses the liver, builds muscle, breaks down fat, and helps normalize blood sugar. We also produce hormones that help fight infections. If we aren't getting sufficient sleep, we get sick more often and take longer to recover. Lack of sleep increases inflammation, which has been linked to heart disease and stroke.

Skimping on shut-eye is linked with obesity in adults and children. Lack of sleep interferes with the levels of ghrelin and leptin, metabolic hormones that signal when you're hungry and when you're full. When you are tired you eat more to obtain fuel and energy to keep you going.

The amount of sleep you need varies based on age, activity level, quality of sleep, and genetics (e.g., some of us really are night owls). Infants typically require 14-15 hours of sleep per 24-hour period; young children about 12 hours; teens about 9 hours, and most adults 7-9 hours. A general rule of thumb for determining your sleep requirement: If you do not wake feeling refreshed, you may not be getting enough sleep.

TIPS FOR A GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP

  1. In the sack for sleep and sex only. Regular sex can improve sleep quality so don't use your time between the sheets to deal with daily hassles--take that outside of the bedroom (or record in a journal). If you don't feel sleepy, leave the room and do something relaxing until you feel drowsy, (see our Natural Therapies for Sound Sleep in this newsletter). Then, go back to bed.
  2. Set a sleep schedule. This includes a soothing pre-sleep routine, such as a warm bath, reading or gentle yoga. Go to bed and wake at the same time each day. This trains your body rhythms, making it easier to fall asleep. If you need a nap, get it in before 5:00 PM; limit to 20 minutes.
  3. Surround yourself with cave-like ambiance. A sleeping space should be quiet, dark, and cool (between 60-72°). If you do shift-work, use blackout shades or an eye mask. Remove electronic devices, computers and TVs from your room. Research shows that use of digital devices within an hour of bedtime has a negative effect on sleep quality.
  4. Let the light in early and exercise regularly. Natural light helps regulates hormones that promote ideal sleep-wake patterns. Open the curtains as early as possible and get outdoors during the day. Also, exercise during the day or early evening makes it easier to fall asleep and increases the amount of deep sleep obtained.
  5. Eat a Light, Last Meal of the Day. A light dinner eaten 2-3 hours before sleep is ideal. A full stomach interferes with sleep as the body works at digestion. Steer clear of spicy or fatty foods that can cause heartburn. If you need a bedtime snack, combine a carbohydrate and protein, such as almond butter on toast, Avoid products containing caffeine, sugar or nicotine as their effects can last several hours. Be mindful of your fluid intake before bed, getting up to use the restroom throughout the night interferes with quality sleep.

ARE YOU SLEEP DEPRIVED?

You don't have to pull "all-nighters" to become sleep deprived. A sleep debt of just 1-2 hours a few nights a week can affect your health and performance. To become fully well-rested and regain energy after a sleep debt, get an extra hour of sleep each night for one week.

If you experience any of the following the signs of sleep deprivation, talk to your healthcare provider about natural approaches to getting your sleep back on track.

  • Daytime drowsiness; fatigue
  • Poor memory; difficulty concentrating
  • Changes in appetite
  • Difficulty dealing with stress
  • Irritability
  • Muscle tension; impaired vision
  • Increase in accidents or clumsiness
REFERENCES

 

FOOD FOR THOUGHT. . .

"Sleep is that golden chain that ties health and our bodies together." - Thomas Dekker

 

THE POWER OF SWEET POTATO

Sweet Potato is a powerhouse of nutrition. This vibrant orange tuber is rich in vitamins, antioxidants, anti-inflammatory nutrients, and blood sugar-regulating nutrients. The antioxidant Beta-carotene, which gives Sweet Potato its orange flesh, is necessary for your body to produce Vitamin A. We need vitamin A for eye health, for a strong immune system, and for healthy skin.

One medium Sweet Potato provides 100% of your daily needs for Vitamin A, as well as a healthy dose of vitamin C, several of the B vitamins, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and vitamin E. Some research has shown that, as antioxidants from Sweet Potato (called cyanidins and peonidins) and other phytonutrients pass through the digestive tract, they act in ways that may lower the health risk posed by heavy metals. Scientists are also studying the anti-inflammatory nutrients (anthocyanin) contained in purple Sweet Potatoes, which may provide protection against certain types of cancer.

Sweet Potatoes also have a fascinating ability to potentially improve blood sugar regulation. Researchers are interested in determining what effect this may have on Type-2 Diabetes. High in fiber, including Sweet Potato in your diet can promote regularity of the bowels and healthy digestive function. You can enjoy Sweet Potato as a main course, side dish, in soups, or in desserts.

When shopping for these versatile veggies, remember that Yams are not the same as Sweet Potatoes. The two are not in the same "food family" and each has a different nutrient profile. Yams are usually imported from Africa or Asia, whereas the Sweet Potato is grown abundantly in the U.S. Finally, Sweet Potato color, both flesh and skin, can range from white to yellow-orange to brown or purple. There also are "firm" or "soft" varieties, which can make a difference in your cooking.

REFERENCES

 

RECIPE: GOOD OLD FASHIONED BAKED SWEET POTATOES

Sweet Potatoes are a perfect food not only for your holiday meals, they also make for a tasty snack or to accompany a hearty soup or salad at lunchtime.

  • 4 large sweet potatoes, scrubbed
  • Coconut oil for brushing
  • Himalayan or Persian Blue salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • Raw organic unpasteurized butter or Earth Balance™ to taste

Heat oven to 450 degrees. Brush potatoes with coconut oil and place potatoes in a glass cooking dish with lid. Cover and cook in hot oven for 40 minutes or until easily pierced with a fork. Remove from oven and serve hot. Season with salt, pepper and butter to taste.

 


CALCIUM ESSENTIAL FOR STRONG BONES, SOUND SLEEP

Did you know that calcium, the most abundant mineral in the human body, is not only essential for strong bones, it also supports healthy functioning of the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and nervous systems? Research shows a relationship between calcium intake and risk for heart disease, colorectal cancer, kidney stones, PMS, and managing a healthy weight. When it comes to sound sleep, insufficient dietary calcium has been associated with insomnia. Calcium is instrumental in the way our brains cycle through the stages of sleep and in the ability to generate brain chemicals, including tryptophan, associated with deep sleep.

All leafy green vegetables and grasses are high in calcium, as well as iron, magnesium, vitamin C, and many of the B vitamins. Dairy is said to be high in calcium but it is also very pro-inflammatory. If you opt for dairy, see that it is organic and preferably from the farmer's market. Vegan sources of this mineral include celery, cauliflower, okra, onions, green beans, avocado, black beans, chickpeas, almonds, dark leafy greens, and tofu.

Calcium neutralizes the acid created by eating animal protein. When you consume acidic foods, the body attempts to return it to an alkaline state by withdrawing calcium from your bones if there isn't enough on hand in the food itself to do the job. Kidneys also use the calcium from bones to eliminate excess nitrogen consumed from animal protein.

For a healthy adult, the recommended intake for a Calcium supplement is 1,000 - 2,000 mg daily, depending on health status and lifestyle habits including exercise. This is based on an average American diet which has 1.5 to 4 times as much protein than necessary, creating an unnatural demand for calcium. Osteoporosis is a calcium robbing problem not a calcium deficiency problem.

There are many factors and forms of calcium supplements (e.g., carbonate, citrate), that affect how well the body absorbs the mineral. Also, calcium supplements can interact with other medications. Too much calcium can stress other bodily systems, leading to health problems. For these reasons, consult with a health practitioner as to which type and dosage of calcium is best for you.

REFERENCES

 

SOOTHING HERBS FOR RESTFUL SLEEP

Lavender (Lavendula species), Chamomile (Matricaria recutita), Oats (Avena sativa)

Three herbs well known for calming effects are Lavender, Chamomile, and Oats. Perhaps, not quite as well known as the first two herbs, Avena sativa (Oats Milky Seed or Oatstraw) is the grain* source of oatmeal. The entire plant is abundant in minerals and trace nutrients, in particular the B-vitamins, calcium, and magnesium, which help soothe and strengthen the nervous system. As an herbal remedy, oats can ease the effects of stress, anxiety or exhaustion and resolve sleeplessness. Oats contain the amino acid tryptophan, which research shows promotes sleep. In fact, Scottish folks suggest a bowl of oatmeal before bedtime to ensure restful sleep!

Of its many medicinal uses, lavender is known worldwide as an herbal "rescue-remedy" for reducing stress, anxiety and tension. Its strong, relaxation-inducing scent is used in massage therapy lotions, candles, bath salts, tinctures and essential oils. As one of the few essential oils that can be applied directly to the skin, a dab of lavender on the inside of your wrist can help soothe a stressful moment. Lavender is also used in teas, often paired with chamomile. If you aren't a tea-drinker, dried lavender can be added to a sachet and placed beneath your pillow to help induce sleep.

Chamomile has been used for centuries as an herbal remedy for easing stress and insomnia. Today, these uses continue and we also have good clinical evidence for the safe use of chamomile preparations to help reduce inflammation, promote more restful sleep, ease colic and digestive upset, and facilitate wound healing when used in a cream. While chamomile seems to reduce the effects of anxiety, which can contribute to sleeplessness, more research is necessary to demonstrate the specific properties of chamomile that contribute to its effects.

Since there are many different ways to prepare these herbs, and some people can be allergic to certain herbs, do check with your wellness practitioner for the best approach to help you relax and get a good night's sleep.

*If you have sensitivity to gluten, be sure to use an oat product produced using gluten-free manufacturing practices.
REFERENCES
  • Mars, B. & Fiedler, C. (2015). The Home Reference to Holistic Health & Healing. Beverly, MA: Fair Winds Press. (pp. 29-29, 45, 193, 200).
  • Bennett, Robin Rose. (2014). The Gift of Healing Herbs. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books.
  • Hoffman, D. (2003). Medical Herbalism. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press. (p. 532,
  • Duke, James. A. (2002). Handbook of Medicinal Herbs (2nd Ed). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. (p. 534)
  • Thorne Research. Matricaria chamomilla (German chamomile). Monograph. Alternative Medicine Review (2008) 13:1, 58-62.
  • D. Wheatley (2005) Medicinal Plants for Insomnia: A Review of Their Pharmacology, Efficacy and Tolerability. J Psychopharmacol, Volume 19, Pages 414-421.
  • Murray, M. "Insomnia." As cited in Pizzorno, Joseph E. (2013). Textbook of Natural Medicine. St. Louis, MO Elsevier. (Chapter 182).
  • Zick, Suzanna M et al. "Preliminary Examination of the Efficacy and Safety of a Standardized Chamomile Extract for Chronic Primary Insomnia: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study." BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 11 (2011): 78. PMC. Web. 13 Oct. 2015.
  • Medicine Talk Professional. Lecture on Healthy Sleep.
  • Sleep Health Foundation (Australia). Herbal Remedies and Sleep.
  • Herbal Academy of New England.

 

 

NATURAL THERAPIES FOR A GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP

journalingBefore your head sinks into the pillow at bedtime, there are some very simple things you can do to prepare your mind and body for a night of deeply restful sleep. The evening hours are a time when the busyness of your day should begin to wind down. It's important to create a bedtime ritual that will help tame the thoughts that may still be racing through your mind and which can prevent you from falling or staying asleep throughout the night.

In addition to the lifestyle tips for better sleep that are described in this month's feature article, try adding some of the following naturopathic and holistic approaches to your evening routine.

  • Enjoy a warm bath including Epsom salts and/or lavender oil.
  • Listen to the relaxing sounds of ocean waves, classical music, or chimes. There are specialized acoustic recordings that are orchestrated to affect specific brain wave patterns for relaxation or sleep.
  • A guided recording of progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing exercises, restorative yoga poses, can help the body create the 'relaxation response'.
  • Herbs and other botanical or aromatherapy treatments are useful for calming down after a stressful day. In addition to the herbs discussed in this month's newsletter, you might want to ask your physician about teas, tinctures or capsule preparations of valerian, skullcap, passionflower, or lemon balm.
  • Try meditation, beginning with just 10 minutes a day. Meditation has numerous health benefits and recent studies show it can significantly affect quality of sleep.
  • Install and change your laptop screen light setting using a natural screen dimer that will help you ease your eyes from bright screens. We use f.lux.
REFERENCES

 

 

 

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

 

The information offered by this newsletter is presented for educational purposes. Nothing contained within should be construed as nor is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment. This information should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. You should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of any information contained within this newsletter.
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